Monday, 13 March 2017

DVD roundup: "I like incongruity" edition


I'm not quite sure what I was expecting from The Accountant. It stars Ben Affleck as a high functioning autistic accountant, who struggles to connect to other people, but has no problem defeating a whole gang of mercenaries. Maybe I was expecting something a bit more serious, but the film quickly breaks down into a silly action flick. Listen to our full podcast review in the player below.


The Light Between Oceans has become noticeable for two things: looking beautiful, and having a boring, melodramatic plot. Set after WWI, Michael Fassbender and Alicia Vikander live on a lighthouse and desire a baby and, luckily, one happens to wash up on the shore on a boat. They decide to keep it, but then have to deal with the baby's real mother. Probably good to watch only if you like ogling at Fassbender and Vikander.





Tom Ford's background in fashion really helps in making some super stylish films, but it would be unwise to underestimate him as a director. A Single Man was an excellent film, and Nocturnal Animals looks to follow suit. Starring Amy Adams as a gallery owner, she is soon disturbed by a manuscript sent to her by her ex-husband (Jake Gyllenhaal), which forces her to search out the deep recesses of her soul, and the start of an intriguing thriller.




I am super excited to watch The Love Witch after reading an interview with the director, Anna Biller, in the latest issue of Sight & Sound. Being about a witch whose love spells work too well and ends up getting involved in murder, The Love Witch works through homages to Alfred Hitchcock and 70s horror to create a pastiche of gender norms and expectations.






Pet has the distinction of being the lowest grossing film of 2016, taking just $70 from one theatre. Don't let that turn you off though, as it does sound like an interesting film. Starring Dominic Monaghan as an obsessive man who cages up a girl he fancies, the film switches things up when the captor becomes the captee. Don't expect anything high-grade, but not one to be ignored either.

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