Monday, 24 June 2013

A SCHOLARLY LIFE


FILM BLOG 8

A SCHOLARLY LIFE

by L. J. Spence

24/06/2013

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My musings so far are usually written a matter of minutes after I have thought of them - you can spend ages thinking what you would imagine someone else would like to read, clearly proving the maxim that writing is ten per cent inspiration, ninety per cent perspiration. In future, there will be more planning, because I am sure that, if presented well, any idea can be made interesting to the reader - this can be the only reason why the British magazine market can support not one, but two major titles on stamp collecting...

Planning can also save you when time is up against you. I know this from fevered experience.

I completed my film degree in 2004, so I am academically qualified to tell you that Adam Sandler is only good in films that were made by people other than himself. I wrote many essays in three years, from the prominence of the private detective in film noir, through the dismantling of narrative from the old Classical Hollywood standard, to the use of sound in the Ben Affleck film "Daredevil" (2003).

Yes, the above film wasn't very good, but the comic book character is great. For a blind superhero that relies on his other senses, an essay surely had to be written about how sound would be used to replicate the character's experience, and enhance the audience's view. The writing would be simple - introduce the idea, write about why it worked, why it doesn't, and come to a conclusion.

However, on the day it was to be handed in, I had spent the preceding night, and some of that morning, finishing another essay about something else I thought was due. In a blind panic - yes, I have just realised I wrote that - I sat down, opened any books, magazines, put my DVD copy of "Daredevil" on standby, and clattered out a 2,500-word essay in two hours.

It was printed as soon as it was finished, and I was out of the house on my ten-mile journey to university, depositing the finished essay with minutes to go. It would be the last essay I wrote on my degree.

You should never plan how your life will turn out, but you can plan the more obvious stuff, like what you are going to write, so, next time, I am going to be really good.

(end)

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